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NOTE: Norwegian applicants to volunteer here should contact the Fredskorps coordinator, Hilde Genberg:  nc12hgen@staff.rcnuwc.no or sahanorproject@gmail.com

Information

What?

A non-denominational community-based field organization.

Where?

Bangkok.

Number of volunteers required?

Varies. Usually several opportunities per year, but must be in single-sex groups if more than one volunteer.

Other requirements?

HDF is a large organisation and is approached by many people every year wishing to volunteer. A guide for volunteers has been prepared, and volunteers will be expected to follow this. In addition, a member of the HDF staff will co-ordinate the volunteers’ activities during their stay at the centre. Volunteers need to be flexible and willing to take on a variety of tasks (see below). Sensitivity to the needs of the centre’s clients is vital.

Benefits?

Because HDF is an established and large organisation, volunteers will have the chance to work for an organisation involved in many diverse areas of community work. It is possible the volunteers will be required to live at or very near to the centre.

Minimum length of stay?

At least three months, but longer preferred.

Volunteer tasks?

HDF runs many educational and training programmes for the benefit of the local community, as well as providing health care and hospice facilities. Volunteers are usually need to assist on various educational programmes, which could be pre-school up to pre-university level. Extracurricular skills (dance, music, theatre, crafts, art) are much appreciated.

Details?

The Human Development Foundation, a nondenominational community-based field organization, was founded in 1974 in Klong Toey, Bangkok’s largest slum, by Father Joe Maier, a Redemptorist Priest, and Sister Maria Chantavarodom, of the Daughters of Queenship of Mary Immaculate. Their first project was a one-baht-per-day kindergarten. Within the next two years, they opened Klong Toey’s first outreach health clinic and a shelter for street children. Fires devastated slum neighbourhoods, sometimes two or three times a year, and the HDF helped rebuild them.Over the past 30 years, the foundation has continuously initiated projects to help the poor. When a pilot program worked in one neighbourhood, it was expanded to another, and in this way, with a staff of 250 dedicated men and women, the HDF now reaches out to friends in over 30 slum communities. (Taken from: www.fatherjoe.org)

Current volunteers?

Martin A Eriksen (Norway)*

Nicolai Hertzberg (Norway)*

*Through the Fredskorps programme

Former volunteers?

2013-2013:

Benedicte Sjøflot (Norway; UWCRCN 10-12) bsjoflot@gmail.com

2011-2012:

Zsolt Szekeres (Hungary; UWCAd 09-11) zsocus@citromail.hu

Maryia Pupko (Belarus; UWCAd 09-11) pupkomarsha@hotmail.com

2007-2008: Si Ji Loo, Malaysia, RCNUWC 05-07 (sijiedaikarche@gmail.com)

2005 – 2006: Angie Toppan and Edmund Cluett, RCNUWC staff members on leave (http://edmundcluett.net/volunteer/)

2005-2006: Matilda Flemming, Finland, RCNUWC 2005 (matildaflemming@abo.fi)
2005: Fiorella Ormeno Incio, Peru, RCNUWC 2004 (fiorellaorm@yahoo.com)
2004-2005: Anna Almqvist, Sweden, RCNUWC 2004 (anna.almqvist@telia.com)
Lars Holen, Norway, RCNUWC 2004 (lars.holen@gmail.com)
Linn Sarac, Sweden, RCNUWC 2004 (linn.sarac@malmo.com)
2002-2003: Pär Boman, Sweden, RCNUWC 2002 (me@parboman.com)
2002: Vivian Chung, Hong Kong, RCNUWC 2003 (vivianchung_hk@hotmail.com)